Castlegar B.C.

Castlegar is the second largest city in the West Kootenay region of British Columbia, Canada. It is located within the Selkirk Mountains at the confluence of the Kootenay and Columbia Rivers. It is a regional trade and transportation centre, with a local economy fueled by forestry, mining and tourism. It is home to Selkirk College, a regional airport, a pulp mill, and several small sawmills. The population of 7,259 people includes a large number of Doukhobors, who were largely responsible for much of Castlegar's early development and growth. (source: Wikipedia)

KM 8.8 CASTLEGAR TRAIL HEAD

The trail officially starts at this gate. The City of Castlegar Water Pump Intake is also located here. There is plenty of room to park your vehicle and take an journey along the columbia and Western trail with camping spots close along the start of the trail. An trail information panel and picnic tables and out-house are also located here.

KM 11.6 LARBARTHE TUNNEL

The current line bypasses the tunnel, which is submerged under Lower Arrow Lake during spring run off. Labarthe Station, at km 11.0 on the bypassed line, utilized a turntable for turning around helper engines that were required for the steep grade to Farron.

KM 16.8 MCCORMACK CREEK BRIDGE

Five deck plate girders carried the railway over McCormack Creek.

KM 21.5 SHIELDS STATION

Shields was the site of a former passenger train flag stop and steam locomotive water stop. Shields was named for a railway contractor, Sim & Shields, which constructed several lines in the United States and Canada, including the Great Northern between Marcus and Grand Forks. A large open area is all that is left of Shields Station.

KM 22.6 TUNNEL

This small tunnel is one of the many tunnels along the trail that had to be blasted thru solid rock on its way to Farron.

KM 23.6 TUNNEL

Rock blasting and the use of hand rock drills were common as many tunnels where being built at the turn of the century.

KM 24.8 FARR CREEK BRIDGE

A 65 meter-long through truss with deck plate approaches and crosses Farr Creek.

KM 25.6 CUB CREEK BRIDGE

This bridge like the others along the trail, over looks the Lower Arrow Lake. This bridge is the ideal spot for photographers who are looking for that great spot for panoramic views of the Arrow Lakes.

KM 27.6 COYKENDAHL TUNNEL

Enter this tunnel a little cautiously as the curature makes for total blackness in the center, and the trail surface may be a little rough and wet in places in the Spring.

KM 28.7 COYKENDAHL STATION

Coykendahl was the location of a 63 car siding. Named for a construction engineer on CPR's Columbia and Western Railway, Coykendahl was the site of a station, and steam locomotive water tank. a Tuscan red shed built into the side of the hill and a Railway Speeder all taht remains of this station.

KM 38.4 BULLDOG TUNNEL

During the construction of this tunnel, as series of switch-backs carried the line over the top of the tunnel. Over a distance of 8.2 kilometers, a 4% grade up six legs of switch-backs took the trains up 155 meters to the summit, then a 4% grade down six legs of switch-backs brought the trains back down 123 meters to reconnect with the line. The tunnel itself cuts a straight line from east to west with a slight hook at the west end. A flash light is needed as it is total darkness for almost the total length of the tunnel. Bull-Dog is the longest tunnel in southern British Columbia.

KM 39.7 TUNNEL STATION

Tunnel was the location of a 13 car storage track, station and water tank. It was named for its position at the west end of the long Bull-Dog Tunnel. The station foundation can still be found, as well as an apple tree over looking Dog Creek Valley.

KM 51.6 FARRON STATION

Named after one of the railway construction engineers, Farron was the summit station of the Monashee Mountains and a turning point for helper locomotives. All the buildings have diasppeared but the foundations still remain, the most prominent remaining item is the concrete diesel cistern along the rail-bed.

KM 59.3 PAULSON STATION

As work on the railway moved to Grand Forks, the Paulson Brothers established a hotel, store and stables in Paulson. Once the railway was completed, the hotel alongside the railway became known as Paulson Station. Later a siding was added at KM 57.3 to service ore shipments from the Bonanza mine and the station was sometimes referred to as Bonanza Siding. Log foundations and the remains of other buildings can be seen along the banks of McRae Creek.

KM 61.3 PAULSON TUNNEL

This tunnel holds on to the cliffs of McRae Creek Canyon below, the tunnel was drilled thou weak rock as many spots inside are lined and reinforced with concrete. The tunnel is in good shape today but some places inside may have small rocks-slides that are visible and is suggested to use caution when passing thou the tunnel.

KM 65.7 CORYELL STATION

The town of Coryell was founded in 1898 under the name of Gladstone. Gladstone sprung up from the news that the construction on the railway had begun at Castlegar and that Gladstone would be one of the stations on route. CPR named the station in 1900 after John A. Coryell; the engineer who made their first survey developed as an early gold mine camp and was important to the Burnt Basin area. An Italian rail worker discovered a very rich vein of ore. One summer he disappeared at night and never returned. buildings have long collapsed with snow and were looted in 1962 when the highway detoured through here.

KM 70.8 SNOWSLIDE BRIDGE

This small bridge crosses an steep part of the trail, where the harsh winters have caused wash-outs on this section. It is one of many known Avalanche paths on the trail.

KM 72.6 LAFFERTY STATION

Lafferty was a 62 car siding and a steam locomotive water stop. It was originally named Wade and later renamed for a Rossland bank manager.

KM 76.8 FIFE STATION

Fife was the site of a 17 car storage track. Named after J. Fife, a Rossland miner. Fife was a passenger flag stop and steam locomotive water stop. Fife is the location of a large lime quarry.